Walking in Mallorca

£10.00

Landscapes of MALLORCA: walks and car tours

by Valerie Crespí-Green

What a marvellous walking guide to Mallorca! (JLC, York)

The perfect door-opener to a new Mallorcan experience. The directions and maps are easy to follow. Take it on holiday and enjoy more of the island. (Rodenplav64, Amazon)

Meticulously detailed routes… incredibly useful. (Weekend Telegraph)

A wonderful guide to walks in Mallorca’s mountains. (Sunday Times)

Click below to read walker’s reviews and use the ‘Look Inside’ feature on Amazon.co.uk (RRP £12.99)

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Description

This was the first walking guide for Mallorca, the guide that won Sunflower the SundayTimes ‘Oscar’ for best travel guide — and eventually made the island one of the most popular walking areas in Europe. The author has lived on Mallorca for over 30 years and knows the island intimately. This completely revised 7th edition includes newly-drawn maps incorporating the recently inaugurated GR221 (‘Drystone Route’) — a long-distance walk which is covered almost in its entirety by the 60 long and short day walks in the book. There are also 10 car tours with accompanying fold-out touring map, as well as plans of Palma and Soller, bus, train and boat timetables and panels of information on Mallorcan customs and features of the landscape. A free online update service informs users of any route-change information. Area covered: The whole island is covered for those touring Mallorca by car, but for walking in Mallorca, emphasis has naturally been placed on the northern sierras. The best months for walking in Mallorca are May, June and October, but you can hike on the island all year round, except for July-early September, when it is far too hot.This was the first walking guide for Mallorca, the guide that won Sunflower the SundayTimes ‘Oscar’ for best travel guide — and eventually made the island one of the most popular walking areas in Europe. The author has lived on Mallorca for over 30 years and knows the island intimately. This completely revised 7th edition includes newly-drawn maps incorporating the recently inaugurated GR221 (‘Drystone Route’) — a long-distance walk which is covered almost in its entirety by the 60 long and short day walks in the book.

There are also 10 car tours with accompanying fold-out touring map, as well as plans of Palma and Soller, bus, train and boat timetables and panels of information on Mallorcan customs and features of the landscape. A free online update service informs users of any route-change information.

Area covered: The whole island is covered for those touring Mallorca by car, but for walking in Mallorca, emphasis has naturally been placed on the northern sierras.

The best months for walking in Mallorca are May, June and October, but you can hike on the island all year round, except for July-early September, when it is far too hot.

Where to stay

Palma, the capital, has bus and train services to every part of the island so it makes an excellent base for walkers. But if you prefer a more leisurely pace, still with good transport links, consider Soller or Pollença or their respective ports.

Edition/contents etc

10 car tours, 60 long and short walks, 27 picnic suggestions
136 pages + touring map; plans of Palma, Sóller, Pollença; 1:50,000 topo maps
8th ed, 2015; ISBN 978-1-85691-463-5; UK retail price £12.99 / USA retail price $17.99

Table of contents:

Preface 5
Acknowledgements 6

Getting about 7
Plan of Palma; Useful addresses/telephone numbers 8

Picnicking 10
Picnic suggestions 11

Touring 16
Car tour 1: SPECTACULAR SOUTHWEST SETTINGS 18
Car tour 2: PRETTY MOUNTAIN VILLAGES 21
Car tour 3: THE MAGNIFICENT MOUNTAIN ROUTE AND THE CAPES 24
Car tour 4: VILLAGES OFF THE BEATEN TRACK AND THE ‘FAR EAST’ 30
Car tour 5: THE ROUTE OF CAVES AND MONASTERIES 35
Car tour 6: SOUTHERN RESORTS AND THE PUIG DE RANDA 39

WALKING 43
Guides, waymarking, maps 43
Right of way 44
What to take 45
Weather 45
Dogs and other nuisances 46
Walkers’ checklist 46
Where to stay 47
A country code for walkers and motorists 48
Organisation of the walks 49
Spanish and Mallorquín 50
Language hints for walkers and picnickers 50
Island customs – past and present 52
THE WALKS
1 Sant Elm · (Cala Basset) · Sa Trapa · Punta d’es Fabiolet · Ses Basses · Andratx 58
2 S’Arracó · Sa Trapa · Punta d’es Fabiolet · Ses Basses · S’Arracó 62
3 Galatzó ascent from Sa Font d’es Pí 64
4 Galatzó circuit from Puigpunyent 66
5 Galatzó ascent from the C710 near Estellencs 70
6 S’Esclop 71
7 Santa Eugènia · Ses Coves · Puig d’en Marron · Santa Eugènia 74
8 Santa Eugènia · So Na Rossa · Sencelles 77
9 Valldemossa · Mirador de Ses Puntes · Camí de S’Arxiduc · Puig d’es Teix · Coma d’es Cairats · Valldemossa 79
10 Three variations on the Teix circuit 83
11 Deià · Cala de Deià · Deià 84
12 Sa Foradada from Son Marroig 86
13 Deià (Ca’n Puigserver) · Son Coll · Sóller 88
14 Es Castell d’Alaró 90
15 From Orient to Santa Maria 93
16 Sóller · Biniaraix · Es Barranc · Es Cornadors · L’Ofre · Sóller 95
17 Es Barranc circuit 98
18 Mirador de Ses Barques · Sa Costera · Cala Tuent · Sa Calobra 99
19 Es Torrent de Pareis 101
20 Cúber Lake · L’Ofre · Cúber Lake 103
21 Cúber Lake · Tossals Verds · Lloseta 105
22 Cúber Lake · Font d’es Prat · Coll d’es Prat · Lluc 108
23 Puig de Massanella – classic ascent 111
24 Lluc · Binifaldó · Aucanella · Binibona · Caimari 113
25 A scramble up the Puig Tomir 116
26 From Lluc to Pollença 118
27 Mortitx · Rafal d’Ariant · Sa Cova de Ses Bruixes overlook · Mortitx 121
28 The Bóquer Valley 123
29 Ermita de la Victoria · Penya Rotja · Talaia d’Alcúdia · Coll Baix · Mal Pas 124
30 Ermita de la Victoria · Coll Baix · Ses Fontanelles · Ermita de la Victoria 126
31 Cala Estreta · Cala Malsoc · Torre d’Aubarca · Platja d’es Verger · Cala Estreta 127
32 Cala Pí · Cap Blanc · Cala Pí 129

Transport timetables 131
Index 134
Glossary 136
Fold-out island map inside back cover

Guidebook index

Alaró (Ah-lah-roh) 29, 90, 91, 131
see also Castell d’Alaró
Alcúdia (Al-koo-dee-ah) 15, 24, 28, 131
Alfabia, Gardens (Al-fah-bee-ah) 21, 23, 24
Algaida (Al-gah-ee-dah) 30, 34, 42
Alquería Blanca (Al-ker-ee-ah Blan-kah) 37
Andratx (An-dratch) 18, 19, 58, 60-61, 131
Artà (Ar-tah) 30, 32, 33, 131
Aucanella (Ow-kah-nehl-yah; farm) 113, 114, 115, TM
Aumedrá 105, 107
Avenc de Son Pou 93, 94
Bálitx (Bah-leech; farms and valley) 99, 100, TM
Banyalbufar (Bahn-yahl-boo-far) 18, 20, 131
Betlem (Bet-lem) 32
Biniali (Bee-nee-ah-lee) 12, 77
Biniaraix (Bee-nee-ah-rash) 12, 24, 95, 98, TM
Binibona (Bee-nee-boh-nah) 14, 113, 115
Binifaldó (Bee-nee-fahl-doh) 14, 27, 113, 114, 116, 117, TM
Bóquer (Boh-kehr; farm and valley) 14, 15, 28, 50, 123
Ca’n Pastilla (Kahn Pas-teel-yah) 39
Ca’n Picafort (Kahn Peek-ah-fort) 30, 31, 131
Ca’n Puigserver (Kahn Pooh-j-sayr-vayr) 88-89, 89
Ca’n Tomeví (Kahn Toe-may-vee) 11, 58, 60-61
Caimari (Kah-ee-mah-ree) 113, 115, 131
Cala (Kah-lah; cove)
Basset (Bah-set) 11, 58, 59, 60-61
Beltrán (Bel-trahn) 15, 40, 129, 130
Bóquer (Boh-kehr) 123
d’Or (Door) 35, 37, 131
de Deià (day Day-yah) 84, 85, 86
Estreta (Es-treh-tah) 15, 33, 127, 128
Figuera (Fee-gay-rah) 35, 38
Llombarts 38
Malsoc (Mal-sok) 15, 127, 128
Murada (Moo-rah-dah) 37
Pí (Pee) 15, 39, 40, 129, 130, 131
Ratjada (Rah-chah-dah) 30, 33, 131
S’Almonia 6, 38
Sant Vicenç (Sant Vee-sens) 28, 131
Tuent (Too-ent) 99, 100, TM

Calas de Mallorca (Kah-lahs day Mah-yohr-kah) 35, 36
Calonge (Kah-long) 37
Camí de S’Arxiduc (Kah-mee day Sar-she-dook) 52, 79, 81, 82, 83
Camí del Rafal 121, 122
Campos (Kahm-pohs) 35, 38, 39, 42
Canaleta de Massanella 54, 106, 109, TM
Cap (Kap; cape)
Blanc (Blahnk) 39, 40, 129, 129, 130
d’es Pinar (dehs Pee-nahr) 24, 29
de Formentor (day For-men-tor) 24, 28

Capdepera (Kap-day-pay-rah) 30, 32-33
Capocorp Vell (Kap-oh-korp Vay) 39, 40, 41
Castell (Kahs-tail; castle)
d’Alaró (Dah-lah-roh) 57, 90, 91, 91
de Bendinat (day Ben-dee-nat) 18
de Santueri (day Sahn-too-eh-ree) 35, 37

Cingles de Son Rul-lan 81, 82, 83
Coll (Koyl; pass, saddle)
Baix (Bash; pass and beach) 15, 125, 126
de Biniamar (day Bee-nee-ah-mahr) 100, TM
de L’Ofre (day Lof-rah) 97, 103, 104, TM
de S’Estret de Son Gallard 79, 80, 82
de Sa Bataia (day Sah Bah-tie-ah) 29, 110, 111, 112, TM
de Sóller (day Sohl-yair) 23
d’es Coloms (das Koh-loms) 106, TM
d’es Pí (das Pee) 20
d’es Prat (das Praht) 52, 108, 109, TM
d’es Puig Major (das Pooh-j Mah-yohr) 25, TM

Colònia de Sant Jordi (Koh-loh-nee-ah day Sahnt Jour-dee) 35, 38
Colònia de Sant Pere (Koh-loh-nee-ah day Sahnt Pair) 31, 32
Coma d’es Cairats (Koh-mah das Kai-rats) 79, 82, 83
Comafreda (Koh-mah-fray-dah; farm) 110, 111, TM
Costa Nord 21
Cova (Koh-vah; cave)
de Sant Antoni 90, 91, 92
de ses Bruixes 121, 122
Cova dels Morts 118, TM

Coves (Koh-vahs; Spanish: Cuevas)
Coves d’Artà 30, 33
de Campanet (day Kahm-pah-net) 24, 29
del Drac (del Drak) 35, 36, 131
dels Hams (dels Hahms) 35

Creek, The 32
Cúber (Koo-behr; valley and lake) 13, 24, 25, 95, 103, 104, 107, 108, 131, TM
Deià (Day-yah) 12, 21, 23, 52, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 88, 131
Dragonera (Drah-goh-nay-rah; island) 63
Ermita (Air-mee-tah; hermitage)
de Betlem 32
de la Victoria 15, 29, 124, 129, 126
de Sa Trinitat 21, 22, 82

Es Barranc (As Bah-rank) 12, 95, 96, 97, 98, TM
Es Cornadors (peaks) 95, 97, TM
Es Cosconar (cave houses) 57
Es Llombarts (As L-yom-barts) 38
Es Pixarell (campsite) 118, 119, TM
Es Trenc (As Trenk) 39, 41
Es Verger (As Ver-shair) 90. 91
Escorca (Es-kor-kah) 26, 101, 131, TM, cover
Estellencs (Es-tell-yenks) 11, 18, 20, 64-65, 70, 71, 73, 131
Felanitx (Fel-an-eetch) 35, 37
Font (Font, spring)
d’es Pí (dahs Pee) 11, 20, 64-65, 69
d’es Polls (dahs Poyls) 12, 82, 83
d’es Prat de Massanella 13, 107, 108, TM
de Bálitx (day Bah-leech) 13, 99, TM
de S’Avenc (day Sa-venk) 112, TM
de Sa Basola (day Sah Bah-soh-lah) 105, TM
de Son Coll (day Sohn Koyl) 12, 88-89
Es Pouet (Ahs Poh-et) 80, 82

Fontanelles (Fon-tah-neyls) 81, 82, 83, 126
Fornalutx (Four-nah-looch) 25, TM
Gorg Blau (Gorge Blow; lake) 13, 24, 26, 104, TM
Inca (Een-kah) 29, 111, 116, 131
La Granja (Lah Gran-hah) 18, 20
Lloseta (L-yo-say-tah) 29, 107, 131
Lluc see Santuari de Lluc
Lluc-Alcari (L-yook Ahl-kah-ree) 23, 84, 85, 88-89
Llucmajor (L-yook-mah-yohr) 39, 40-1, 42
L’Ofre (Lof-rah; farm) 56, 95, 96, 105, TM
see also Coll de L’Ofre, Puig de L’Ofre
Mal Pas (Mahl Pahs) 15, 29, 126
Manacor (Mah-nah-kohr) 34, 35, 132
Maria de la Salut (Mah-ree-ah day lah Sah-loot) 30, 31
Mirador (Mee-rah-door; viewpoint)
d’es Colomer (dahs Koh-loh-mair) 28
de Ricardo Roca (day Ree-kahr-doh Roh-kah) 19
de Ses Barques (day Ses Bahr-kahs) 13, 24, 25, 99, 133, TM
de Ses Ortigues (day Ses Or-tee-gahs) 19
de Ses Puntes (day Ses Poon-tahs) 79, 80, 82

Monasteries see Ermita, Santuari
Montuïri 35, 38
Mortitx (Moor-teech; farm and valley) 27, 121, 122
Mountains see Penya, Puig
Natura Parc 30
Orient (Or-ee-ent) 90, 91, 93, 94, 94, TM
Valley 12, 29, 103, TM
Palma (Pal-mah) 18, 21, 24, 30, 35, 39, 132-3
town plan 8-9,
Parc de la Victoria (Park day lah Veek-toh-ree-ah) 15, 125, 126
Peguera (Pah-geh-rah) 18, 19, 131
Penya Rotja (Payn-yah Rot-yah) 124, 125, 126
Petra (Pe-trah) 30, 34, 131
Platja (Plat-ya; beach; Spanish: Playa)
de Canyamel (Kahn-yah-mel) 33
d’es Verger (das Ver-shair) 127, 128
see also Cala, Coll Baix, Es Trenc

Pollença (Pohl-yen-sah) 24, 26, 27, 57, 118-9, 120, 131
Porreres (Poh-rare-ras) 35, 38
Port (Pohrt)
d’Alcúdia (d’Ahl-koo-dee-ah) 24, 29, 131
d’Andratx (d’Ahn-dratch) 18, 19, 131
de Pollença (day Pohl-yen-sah) 14, 24, 28, 123, 131
de Sóller (day Sohl-yair) 21, 23, 131, TM
de Valldemossa (day Vahl-day-moh-sah) 21, 22

Porto Colom (Pohr-toh Koh-lohm) 35, 37
Porto Cristo (Pohr-toh Krees-toh) 35, 36, 131
Porto Petro (Pohr-toh Peh-troh) 35, 37
Puig (Pooh-j; mountain; see also Penya)
Basset (Bah-set) 11, 60-1, 62
d’Alaró (d’Ah-lah-roh) 91, 91, 92
d’en Marron (den Mah-ron) 74, 75, 76
d’es Teix (dahs Tesh) 79, 82, 83
de Galatzó (day Gah-laht-soh) 20, 64-5, 66, 67, 69, 70
de L’Ofre (day Lof-rah) 95, 97, 103, 104, TM
de Maria (day Mah-ree-ah) 27
de Massanella (day Mas-sah-nehl-yah) 52, 105, 111, 112, TM
de Randa (day Ran-dah) 39, 42
de Romaní (day Roh-mah-nee) 15
de Santa Eugènia (day Sahn-tah Ay-oo-heh-nee-ah) 11, 13, 74, 76, 76
de Ses Basses 59, 60-1
Major (Mah-yohr) 25, 104, 107, TM
S’Alcanada (Sal-kah-nah-dah) 92
Tomir (Toh-meer) 115, 117-8, TM

Puigpunyent (Pooh-j-poon-yent) 18, 20, 64-5, 66, 69
Punta d’es Fabiolet (Poon-tah das Fah-bee-oh-let) 58, 59, 60-1, 62, 63
Rafal d’Ariant (Rah-fahl d’Ah-ree-ant) 121, 122
Randa (Rahn-dah) 42
Reserva Africana (AutoSafari) 35, 36
Reserva de Galatzó 18, 20
S’Albufera (Sahl-boo-fay-rah) 30. 31
S’Arenal (Sah-ray-nahl) 39
S’Arracó (Sah-rah-koh) 11, 19, 60-1, 62, 63, 131
S’Esclop (Sas-klop) 64-5, 71, 72-73
S’Esgleieta 21
S’Estanyol (Ses-tahn-yohl) 39, 40
Sa Calobra (Sah Kah-loh-brah) 13, 24, 26, 27, 99, 100, 101, 102, 131, TM
Sa Costera (Sah Kohs-teh-rah) 99, 100, TM
Sa Cova de ses Bruixes 121, 122
Sa Foradada (Sah Foh-rah-dah-dah) 12, 86, 87
Sa Pobla (Sah Poh-blah) 29
Sa Rápita (Sah Rah-pee-tah) 40
Sa Trapa (Sa Trah-pah) 58, 59, 60-1, 62, 63
Sant Elm (Sahnt Elm; Spanish: San Telmo) 11, 18, 19, 58, 60-1, 131
Sant Joan (Sahnt Joe-an; Spanish: San Juan) 30, 34
Sant Llorenç d’es Cardassar (Sahnt Lyor-ens das Kahr-dahs-sahr) 30, 34
Sant Pere (Sahnt Payr; chapel at Escorca) 26, TM
Santa Eugènia (Sahn-tah Ay-oo-heh-nee-ah) 11, 12, 74-75, 76, 77, 131
Santa Margalida (Sahn-tah Mahr-gah-lee-dah) 30, 31
Santa Maria (Sahn-tah Mah-ree-ah) 93, 94, 131
Santanyí (Sahn-tan-yee) 35, 37
Santuari (San-too-eh-ree; monastery; Spanish: Santuario, Monasterio) 63
de Cura (day Koo-rah) 39, 42
de Lluc (day L-yook) 2, 14, 24, 26, 47, 53, 57, 108, 110, 111, 113, 114, 116, 117, 118, 131, TM
de Monti-Sion (day Mohn-tes-ee-on) 35, 38
de Sant Salvador (day Sahnt Sal-vah-door) 33, 35, 37

Sencelles (Sen-say-lahs) 77, 78, 131
Ses Coves (Sehs Koh-vahs) 74, 76, 76
Ses Covetes (Sehs Koh-veh-tahs) 39, 41
Ses Paisses (Ses Pye-ee-sas) 33
Ses Salines (Ses Sal-ee-nahs) 35, 38
Sineu (See-nay-oo) 30
So Na Rossa (Soh Nah Rohs-sah) 12, 77, 78
Sóller (Sohl-yair) 12, 21, 24, 25, 55, 88-89, 89, 95, 97, 98, 99, 131, TM
town plan 95
Son Coll (Sohn Koyl) 88-89
Son Fortuny (picnic area) 64-5, 71, 73
Son Marroig (Sohn Mah-roh-j) 21, 23, 86, 86, 87
Son Servera (Sohn Sehr-vay-rah) 34
Talaia (Tah-lah-yah; watchtower; Spanish: Atalaya; see also Torre)
d’Alcúdia (d’Al-koo-dee-ah) 124, 125, 126
de Ses Animes (day Ses Ah-nee-mahs) 20, 70

Torre (Tor-ray; tower; see also Talaia)
d’Aubarca (d’Ow-bahr-kah) 127, 128
de Cala Basset (day Kah-lah Bah-set) 10, 11, 58, 60-1, 61
de Canyamel 33, 56
Picada (Pi-kah-dah) 55
see also Canyamel

Torrent (Toh-rehnt; stream)
de Lluc (day L-yook) 101, TM
de Mortitx 121, 122
de Pareis (day Pahr-rays) 13, 26, 27, 101, 102, TM, cover

Tossals Verds (hikers’ refuge) 106, 107, TM
Valldemossa (Vahl-day-moh-sah) 1, 12, 21, 22, 79, 82, 83, 131
Vilafranca de Bon Any (Veel-yah-fran-kah day Bohn Ah-nee) 35

Current update

Mallorca, 8th ed (2015), updated 12/02/16

Updates for walks and car tours (drives) on Mallorca given below supplement those provided in the guidebook. It is vital that this Update is read in conjunction with the text of the book, but note that the Update applies only to the edition stated and not to any earlier editions. (If you have an older edition of this book you can “upgrade” to the latest edition at half price.)

Information has been forwarded to us by users of the book, and Sunflower Books offers the data in good faith but cannot be held responsible for any misleading or inaccurate content in the Update. Unless indicated otherwise, what appears here has not been verified by the author or publisher, so please allow due caution when new or amended routes are suggested. Each piece of information is dated; bear in mind that some of the older observations may have since been overtaken by events or further changes. If, during your holiday, you are using the current edition of the guide and are able to provide any additional updating to add to this page, we will be pleased to hear from you. Please send information, preferably by e-mail, to info@sunflowerbooks.co.uk.

Walking: On page 44 of this book edition there is reference to purchasing maps at Casa Del Mapa (C/Santo Doming in Palma). This shop is closed permanently and there is no alternative and their website does not work. It is extremely difficult to obtain decent walking maps in Mallorca that give definition to the same standard as an Ordnance Survey map. The Kompass maps are the best for detail but also difficult to obtain on the island. I would suggest purchasing a Kompass map prior to departing for Mallorca. (User, 6/16)

Walk 9: IMPORTANT: As it explains in the book, the Mirador de Ses Puntes is now off-bounds, in a restricted area (shown on the map in the book). Last year we posted information from a user who obtained a permit to walk there. But we have now received more information from the owners of the land; see below and be sure to obtain the relevant permission, to make the most of this walk!
“We would like to take this opportunity to inform you about the Vulture
Mountain (Muntanya del Voltor) Land Stewardship project in Valldemossa,
where there is the Archiduke’s path described in maps and guides. For more than a year the private estates of Son Moragues, Son Gual, Son Gual Petit and Can Costa have been involved in a project whose aim, among others, is to regulate the hiking activity taking place on these properties. The increase in the number of hikers has risen sharply in recent years (with more than 45,000 tallied between October 2014 and October 2015), and has begun to raise concerns among property owners, the FVSM and the Ajuntament de Valldemossa regarding the numerous negative impacts caused by this intense activity.
In order to manage hiking activities at the area (shown in the map on page 82) a reservation system has been created, with a limit on the number of daily visitors and a maximum of 15 people per group. Outdoor adventure companies and guides would only be permitted from Monday to Friday, due to the high occurrence of local people during the weekend, who we would like then to give preference on Saturday and Sunday. Reservation functions via e-mail at valldemossa@procustodia.org. Anyone who wishes to have access to trails passing through the above-mentioned fincas must request a reservation by writing to this address, including both self-guided individuals and agency-guided groups. We ask that requests be made as far in advance as possible, indicating the details of the trail: name, day, route, number of people (a maximum of 15 per group).
Permission for access will be granted if there is room on the desired date
and will be confirmed by e-mail. If the maximum quota is already filled,
alternative dates or trails will be proposed if necessary. It’s important to
keep in mind that without the required permission, access to the area will
not be allowed to either individuals or groups. It is therefore
indispensable to make a reservation and receive the required confirmation.” (Sunflower, 2/16)

Overnight accommodation: In case you want to stay at a monastery, etc, here are the telephone numbers:

Lluc: 971-871525
San Salvador: 971 827282
Monti-Sion: 971 647185
Cura: 971 120260
Puig de María: 971 184132
Ermita de Bonany: 971 561101
Ermita on the Puig St Miquel: 971 646314
Castell d’Alaró: 971 510480
Tossals Verds: 971 182027

Monastery/refuge accommodation: Castel d’Alaró now has five new 4-bedded bunk rooms with radiator (12 euros). Take your own sleeping bag; blanket and pillow provided. Cold rainwater only (take sterilizing tablets); NO showers. Bar/meals available in common/dining room by fire. Refugi La Muleta by Soller lighthouse is the same as Tossals Verds, but only one large mixed dorm (so snorers, please give this a miss!). Only walkers and cyclists are accepted. Warm, comfortable, showers, meals available. Usually 3 nights maximum stay (10 euros). On Saturdays usually booked in advance by locals. Sheet hire extra, or take your own. New refuge “Can Boi” opened in Deia June 2006. Same as Tossals Verds and Muleta. 2 dorms with 18 and 12 beds. For all 3 ring government department Mon-Fri between 9am and 2pm. 971 173 700/731. Website www.conselldemallorca.net (but English version not up to date – manage in Catalan or Castellano if poss!) (Various users)

WALKS IN PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF THE BOOK

CASTEL DEL REI: This is now open again, but you have to get a permit from the tourist office either in Pollenca or Port de Pollensa. Take your passport with you, and book a date a few days in advance as the permit comes from the local authority and only twenty walkers per day are given access to the valley. We did the walk in September and it is just as lovely as ever, but now with this system you are given more time to enjoy the walk and the choice of day to walk. Do try it again if you remember it from a few years ago. You can no longer gain access to the castle itself (said to be unsafe!), but you do now have time to walk down to the cala. Hope that more people take the oportunity to do this walk again as so much effort has been made to open the valley up to walkers again! (User, 11/11) + A further update to the previous update regarding the Castell del Rei walk! The required permit can now be completed online by going to http://www.ajpollenca.net/ternelles.html, selecting the date required and where there is still availability. Then enter name, passport, address, telephone and email address. A subsequent email will be received granting permission which should be printed off and taken with you on the day of the visit. Google translate can help with the Catalan on the form! This worked fine for us except the security guard wanted a printed paper copy rather than the version on my phone, but still let us in with the promise of the email being forwarded. (User, 3/13)

PUIG DE S’AGUILA: A walk which featured in the early editions of the Landscape “Mallorca” was from Cala San Vicente up to Puig de S’Aguila, when it used to be possible in the 1980s to walk this. This ceased in the 1990s when it was a) restricted to certain days of the week, and b) prohibited altogether. We have looked at it in recent years but the prohibition notices were still there. This year, however, we spotted people on it, and went to investigate. The notices have gone, access is OK, and there is even a monument at the start dedicated to walkers who strive to keep routes open. It was always a popular walk, useful to tie in with the path over Soller from Puerto Pollensa to SCV, and could perhaps be re-considered? Foreigners and Mallorquins are now back on it, the latter continuing on to Mola. (User, 5/08)